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Testing: Software Development Catalyst

Testing is not an isolated activity. It interacts with and influences other disciplines in software development such as design, coding, release management, and deployment. As testers, our skills and experiences add value far beyond the immediate context of verifying functionality. Threats to value other than software errors exist.

Yet our discussions are often constrained to the testing space, omitting the connections to, and dependencies on, other roles and activities. Testing is an integral discipline of software development, and often plays an active and important role in bridging gaps between technical and business-focused roles, between leaders and engineers, and between makers and users.

How does the testing piece fit into the software development puzzle? How does – and how should – testing interact with other disciplines in software development? How can we most effectively add value to the software development projects we participate in?

Please join us for our 11th annual conference at the Simon Fraser University Harbour Centre campus in downtown Vancouver, Canada, August 8-10 2016.

 


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Saturday, August 6
 

08:30

TestRetreat
Limited Capacity seats available

Build, Test, Fix, Retest.

It's time for something different.

It's time for a TestRetreat.

Sign up for TestRetreat here

In the downtown Vancouver, on August 6th, you’ll find something different.  A chance to connect with old friends, make new ones, and build the test experience you really need, based on your shared interest, right now.

Overview

First we create a one-day open spaces event on August 6th, beginning at 9:00AM and running to 5:00PM.  We place the event in downtown Vancouver.  We'll bring together the best and brightest minds in Software Testing; perhaps a few from the overall process of software (and value!) delivery.  On top of that we have an optional Friday dinner, with no content on Sunday. Take the day to relax, move projects forward (more about that later), build relationships, take a leisurely trip home -- or stick around for other events in the area the following week.

Since 2012, Matt Heusser has been running unconferences on the weekend prior to CAST with unofficial AST support. This year, we've decided to make the partnership official, providing Matt with the resources and access he needs to truly integrate TestRetreat with CAST. So come to Vancouver a few days early. Work with some of testing's most serious contributors in a conference that creates emergent value. Take some time to think, to rest, and get to know people Sunday - then attend CAST on Monday, rested and ready to keep going!

Sign up for TestRetreat here

Before the Conference

Attendance is limited to 50 total attendees; first come, first serve.

Every attendee will list what they want to talk about. Each attendee should expect to offer at least one session to host.  Hosts can lead discussion, present, or facilitate.  

Sign up for TestRetreat here

The Open Space Format 

Saturday’s “Main Event” will be a full-day open space conference, with a short theme of “Deliberate Practice.”  The longer theme is “Advancing And Influencing the Craft while growing personally and professionally.”  [EP1] After gathering a list of proposals, the group will conduct a rapid vote, called a dotting exercise, then create the schedule based on interest.

In other words, the attendees will build the schedule they want, in real time, based on our interests.   

The conference location will provide a continental breakfast and snacks throughout the day.  We’ll break for lunch, then regroup and open space for two more hours.  In the last afternoon may break into groups by project, to plan what we will actually do. The evening is open to teams to go plan and execute on projects.

The event is also the 2016 gathering for the MiagiDo School of Software Testing, but any serious student of test and quality is welcome to apply.

Sign up for TestRetreat here

Why Attend?

  • We put the best people in the field in one room – people doing software testing, test coaching, and helping others do it

  • That group of people will decide on a small handful of things we could do to impact the software community in a wildly positive way

  • The format combines a workshop with Just Enough Structure with plenty of unstructured, informal time.  Or bring your own ideas for what to do Sunday! 

  • We will share our stories, approaches, and ideas about testing

  • We will invent and experiment with new testing and coaching practices

  • It may involve discussing new, fundamental roles for testers and leaders of testers

  • We will discuss, document, and create new ways to influence the state of the practice, as well as projects to move things forward

  • How often do you get a chance to sit back and envision your next few years, surrounded by colleagues that can encourage you and offer realistic feedback?


Moderators
avatar for Matthew Heusser

Matthew Heusser

Principal Consultant, Excelon Development
Matt has deep experience in software testing, project management, development, writing, and systems improvement. His extensive network of contacts in these fields has enabled him to put together a diversified, high-level team of experts at Excelon. | | In 2006, Matt was lead organizer for the initial Great Lakes Software Excellence Conference, a regional event that continues today. He organized the Agile-Alliance Sponsored Workshop on the... Read More →

Saturday August 6, 2016 08:30 - 16:30
Best Western Plus Chateau Granville Hotel & Suites 1100 Granville St, Vancouver, BC V6Z 2B6, Canada
 
Monday, August 8
 

07:30

Lean Coffee
Lean Coffee is a structured, but agenda-less meeting. Participants gather, build an agenda, and begin talking. Conversations are directed and productive because the agenda for the meeting was democratically generated. 

The format for a Lean Coffee is very simple. This is intentional. It is meant to be the least structure necessary for a coherent and productive meeting. No more, no less.

From http://leancoffee.org/

Moderators
avatar for Matthew Heusser

Matthew Heusser

Principal Consultant, Excelon Development
Matt has deep experience in software testing, project management, development, writing, and systems improvement. His extensive network of contacts in these fields has enabled him to put together a diversified, high-level team of experts at Excelon. | | In 2006, Matt was lead organizer for the initial Great Lakes Software Excellence Conference, a regional event that continues today. He organized the Agile-Alliance Sponsored Workshop on the... Read More →
avatar for Justin Rorhman

Justin Rorhman

Software Tester
Justin has been a professional software tester in various capacities since 2005. In his current role, Justin is a consulting software tester and writer working with Excelon Development. Outside of work, he is currently serving on the Association For Software Testing Board of Directors as President helping to facilitate and develop projects like BBST, WHOSE, and the annual conference CAST. Justin deeply interested in software testing and delivery... Read More →

Monday August 8, 2016 07:30 - 08:30
Teck Gallery Lounge (1305) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

08:00

Breakfast
Monday August 8, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Segal Centre (1400-1430) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

09:00

What Catalyzes Testing? Testability!
Whether you are Agile or Waterfall, you want testability. Whether you release periodically or continuously, you want testability. Testability means how easily a product can be tested. In other words, do bugs hide from you, lurking deep in the folds of your technology? Or do they run out and surrender when you come by, wearing bright reflective vests? Developers need to know this, not just to help the testing process, but to improve debugging, maintenance, and eliminate irreproducible bugs. And testers need to know this, in order to make the case to developers and management that testability creates speed and enables agility.

We will first consider the big picture: a revised version of the Agile Testing Quadrants that shows how testability is a core element. Then we will delve into the five major dimensions of testability: project-related, value-related, subjective, intrinsic, and epistemic. Finally, we will deal with how to assess the testability of a product.

Speakers
avatar for James Bach

James Bach

CEO and Principal Consultant, Satisfice, Inc.
James Bach (consulting software tester and Buccaneer-Scholar) is an acclaimed innovator and coach in the field of software testing. After spending a few years as a video game programmer, in 1987 he became the youngest manager at Apple Computer when, at 20, he was hired to run a test team. He has been a tester ever since. He spent about ten years managing testing in Silicon Valley, but for the last fifteen years, he has traveled the world... Read More →


Monday August 8, 2016 09:00 - 12:30
Canfor Policy Room (1600) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

09:00

Just-in-Time Software Testing – Powerful Tools for Fast-Changing Projects and Priorities
– Test projects that have few or no written requirements

– Conduct testing “triage” to find important bugs more quickly

– Learn to plan and schedule testing in a dynamic, unpredictable world

– Practice session-based exploratory testing to find show-stopper bugs and change the way you test

– Gain the confidence you need to succeed

Dealing with Software Project Turbulence

Turbulent development projects experience almost daily requirements changes, user interface modifications, and the continual integration of new functions, features, and technologies. Keep your testing efforts on track while reacting to changing priorities, technologies, and user needs. This highly interactive workshop offers a unique set of tools to help you cope with—and perhaps even flourish in—what may seem to be a totally chaotic environment. Practice dynamic test planning and scheduling, test idea development, bug tracking, reporting, test triage, exploratory testing, and much more.

Getting Ready for Almost Anything They Can Throw at you

Be ready for just about anything that can happen in a software testing project such as a complex, customer-facing Mobile, Web, e-commerce or embedded applications. Learn to identify, organize, and prioritize your testing “ideas.” Respond effectively to business, technological and organizational and cultural changes to your testing projects. Create workflows to schedule testing tasks dynamically and adapt the testing focus as priorities change. Decide on purpose what not to test— not just because the clock ran out!

Real Techniques Proven in Real Projects

Just-In-Time Testing (JIT) approaches are successfully applied to many types of software projects—commercial off-the-shelf applications, agile and iterative development environments, mission-critical business systems, and just about any application type. Real examples demonstrate how JIT testing either replaces or complements more traditional approaches. Examples are drawn from insurance, banking, telecommunications, medical, and other industries. The course is packed with interactive exercises in which students work together in small groups to apply JIT testing concepts.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Sabourin

Robert Sabourin

President, AmiBug.Com, Inc.
Getting things done!


WOMMAP pdf

Monday August 8, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
Labatt Hall (1700) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

09:00

Let’s Take Automated Checking Beyond WebDriver

The testing community is fixated on Automated GUI Checking.

The majority of automators are opting for Selenium WebDriver. Selenium is a fantastic project, and WebDriver has a superb API. If I was wanting to automate user journeys in the browser, I would turn to WebDriver. Unfortunately, WebDriver seems to be the default tool for a lot of (if not all) the automated checking teams do, regardless of context, and what it is they are actually trying to check.

This can be problematic for multiple reasons. Primarily, these checks tend to be slow and brittle (this of course depends on the skill level of the person creating them). Another is that by nature of them being at the browser level, you almost always end up checking a lot more than what you intend to. They’re not focused and targeted on a specific piece of functionality or behaviour.

It doesn’t have to be this way, though. Tools below the GUI have come a long way in recent years. There are endless javascript libraries available for automated checking of javascript. With more teams adopting APIs, there has been an increase in tools available for doing automated API checking. There has also been huge advancements in visual checking tools, which teams can also take advantage of.

In this technical hands-on tutorial, Richard and Mark will introduce attendees to these new tools/frameworks. We will work as one big automation team to move existing GUI WebDriver checks further down or up the stack. After examining what the original intention of the check was, and now having more exposure to new tools, could we rewrite them at a different level in the stack? Then, reflecting on the impact this has had to our automated checking, including whether the checks are more targeted or faster than before.

The experiential aspect of this tutorial is that it’s up to you (the attendees) where we decide checks move to, if they move at all. We will be working as one big team, so there will be lots of lots of discussion and learning from peers. If you’re interested in advancing your automated checking, come along.

Learning Objectives

Attendees in this workshop will get exposure to many new frameworks, tools and libraries. They will learn that these new tools aren’t any more difficult than WebDriver. The will also see that working with WebDriver all this time has armed them with a lot more programming skill then they may have realised. Which in turn can really help them improve their automated checking tools, which in turn could improve the team approach to testing, improve quality and really help the business.

Attendees will be tasked with reviewing an existing suite of automated checks, attempting to understand what they original purpose was, a useful skill when moving to a new team or trying to improve existing checks. They will be given hint and tips on how to do this. They will partake in multiple discussions with attendees and experts from the field.


Speakers
avatar for Richard Bradshaw

Richard Bradshaw

Software Tester, Friendly Tester
Richard Bradshaw is an experienced tester, consultant and generally a friendly guy. He shares his passion for testing through consulting, training and giving presentation on a variety of topics related to testing. He is a fan of automation that supports testing. With over 10 years testing experience, he has a lot of insights into the world of testing and software development. Richard is a very active member of the testing community, the founder... Read More →
avatar for Mark Winteringham

Mark Winteringham

Test Manager, Astrazeneca
Mark is a technical test manager, testing coach and international speaker, presenting workshops and talks on technical testing techniques. He has worked on award-winning projects across a wide variety of technology sectors ranging from broadcast, digital, financial and public sector working with various Web, mobile and desktop technologies. | | Mark is an expert in technical testing and test automation and is a passionate advocate of... Read More →


Monday August 8, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

09:00

Testopsies — Dissecting Your Testing
Have you ever studied testing? Too few testers, so it seems, have read a book on testing or its underlying principles. Even fewer have studied testing by deliberately observing evaluating it directly and systematically.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, an autopsy is an “examination to discover the cause of death or the extent of disease”, ultimately derived from the Greek work “autoptes”, meaning “eyewitness”. Doctors perform autopsies to learn about the human body and to discover how things might have gone wrong. A testopsy—to use a word coined by James Bach—is an examination of testing work, performed by watching a testing session in action and evaluating it with the goal of sharpening observation and analysis of testing work. Testopsies can help in training, assessment, and developing testing skill for novices and experienced testers alike.

In this one-day workshop, led by Michael Bolton, participants will learn from each other by preparing and performing a series of testopsies. The process begins with creating a coding system, mapping out the activities that testers perform and the skills and tactics they apply. Using the coding system to guide observation, participants will watch each other as they test software, record what happens, and then discuss the activity and refine the coding system. Join us as we dissect our testing!

Speakers
avatar for Michael Bolton

Michael Bolton

Developsense
Michael Bolton is a consulting software tester and testing teacher who helps people to solve testing problems that they didn't realize they could solve.  He is the co-author (with senior author James Bach) of Rapid Software Testing, a methodology and mindset for testing software expertly and credibly in uncertain conditions and under extreme time pressure.  Michael has almost 30 years of experience testing, developing, managing... Read More →


Monday August 8, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
Repap Policy Room (1425) 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

10:40

Break
Monday August 8, 2016 10:40 - 11:00
SFU Harbour Centre Concourse Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

12:30

Lunch
Monday August 8, 2016 12:30 - 13:30
Segal Centre (1400-1430) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

13:30

Learning to Say No
Although we’d like to be able to say “yes”, there are times when saying “no” serves our projects, our teammates and our stakeholders best.

Testers can be subject to many conflicting or unreasonable demands. A manager may insist we work on several projects simultaneously, making it impossible for us to do good work on any of them. There may be enormous pressure to work long hours, which will jeopardize our health and the quality of our testing. Sometimes we’re expected to commit to something that we don’t know how to do. We can even find ourselves pressured to misrepresent our findings about the quality of the software.

Paradoxically, learning to say a good “no” enhances our ability to say a meaningful “yes”. If we can say “no” appropriately to demands we know to be wrong for us or for the project, then we can also say “yes” with whole-hearted commitment.

Saying “no” is not easy for anyone, but it is a skill that we can learn.

This half-day tutorial will consist primarily of experiential exercises and debriefs—as many as we have time for. Some volunteer participants will get to practice saying “no” to unreasonable demands. Everyone will have opportunities to observe the interactions, ask questions, discuss, and draw their own conclusions.

This session is intended for testing practitioners and managers at all levels of experience.

Learning Objectives
Why “no” can be a more positive answer than “yes” in certain contexts
How to recognize and resist the many tactics people can use to get us to say “yes”
How to say “no” when that is the right answer for us—simply, and with conviction, equilibrium and respect

Speakers
avatar for Fiona Charles

Fiona Charles

Principal Consultant, Quality Intelligence
Fiona Charles teaches organizations to manage their software testing risk, and IT practitioners project skills "beyond process" - hands-on practical skills essential to thrive and excel on any kind of software project. An expert test consultant and manager, she has been in the thick of the action through 30+ years of challenging projects across the business spectrum on both sides of the Atlantic. Throughout her career, Fiona has advocated... Read More →


Monday August 8, 2016 13:30 - 17:00
Canfor Policy Room (1600) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

15:00

Break
Monday August 8, 2016 15:00 - 15:20
SFU Harbour Centre Concourse Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

19:00

Beer Aficionado's Tour through Vancouver
This will be a spectacular evening all around your favourite soft drink - beer. Your host will be Ilari Henrik Aegerter, who is a passionate home brewer and who is very keen to share anything he knows about beer. Here's the schedule:

meet at 19:00 SFU Harbour Center Concourse
19:00-19:30 Introduction into beer brewing incl. sampling of one of Ilari's home brew
19:30 Walk to the pier
19:46 Take ferry to North Vancouver
20:00-21:20 Beers and dinner at http://sailorhagarspub.com/
21:32 Take ferry back to the South
21:45 Visit Steamworks Brewpub http://steamworks.com/brew-pub
Have a beer
22:30 Walk to Alibi Room http://www.alibi.ca
Have more beers
open end

Board of Directors
avatar for Ilari Henrik Aegerter

Ilari Henrik Aegerter

Managing Director, House of Test GmbH
Ilari Henrik Aegerter's formal studies have brought him from General Linguistics and Sociology to Software Engineering and Software Testing. He has 10+ years of experience in the field, coming from the medical software domain at Phonak AG and progressing ... Read More →


Monday August 8, 2016 19:00 - 23:00
SFU Harbour Centre Concourse Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3
 
Tuesday, August 9
 

07:30

Lean Coffee
Lean Coffee is a structured, but agenda-less meeting. Participants gather, build an agenda, and begin talking. Conversations are directed and productive because the agenda for the meeting was democratically generated. 

The format for a Lean Coffee is very simple. This is intentional. It is meant to be the least structure necessary for a coherent and productive meeting. No more, no less.

From http://leancoffee.org/

Moderators
avatar for Matthew Heusser

Matthew Heusser

Principal Consultant, Excelon Development
Matt has deep experience in software testing, project management, development, writing, and systems improvement. His extensive network of contacts in these fields has enabled him to put together a diversified, high-level team of experts at Excelon. | | In 2006, Matt was lead organizer for the initial Great Lakes Software Excellence Conference, a regional event that continues today. He organized the Agile-Alliance Sponsored Workshop on the... Read More →
avatar for Justin Rorhman

Justin Rorhman

Software Tester
Justin has been a professional software tester in various capacities since 2005. In his current role, Justin is a consulting software tester and writer working with Excelon Development. Outside of work, he is currently serving on the Association For Software Testing Board of Directors as President helping to facilitate and develop projects like BBST, WHOSE, and the annual conference CAST. Justin deeply interested in software testing and delivery... Read More →

Tuesday August 9, 2016 07:30 - 08:30
Teck Gallery Lounge (1305) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

08:00

Breakfast
Tuesday August 9, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Segal Centre (1400-1430) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

09:00

Keynote - Nicholas Carr
*This session will be livestreamed only, no recording will be made for later viewing.

Speakers
avatar for Nicholas Carr

Nicholas Carr

Nicholas Carr writes about technology and culture. He is the author of the acclaimed book The Glass Cage: How Our Computers Are Changing Us, which examines the personal and social consequences of our ever growing dependency on computers, robots, and apps. His previous work, The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains, was a 2011 Pulitzer Prize finalist and a New York Times bestseller. His new... Read More →


Tuesday August 9, 2016 09:00 - 10:40
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (1900) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

10:40

Break
Tuesday August 9, 2016 10:40 - 11:00
SFU Harbour Centre Concourse Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

11:00

Domain Supported Automation for Mobile App Testing
As an automation team you have to work with various domains to get your automation up and running. Most the time it is difficult to get everybody aligned. Here you have to make smart decision which tools you are going to use. In this talk we will focus on the automation for a mobile app, the choices we made to get alignment with the business, testers, development and functional maintenance.

We made several choices how to set up our automation framework. The first choice was to use the Gherkin language (Given - When - Then) to create the automation scripts. The second choice was how to set up the automation environment, i.e. the tools and the coding language. For Android, we are using Espresso as the automation environment. For iOS, we are using UI Automator as the automation environment, the code language we use is Swift. By defining the tools we made a choice which coding languages we are going to use, Java (for Espresso) and Swift (for iOS). For the automation engineers, the assignment is to write the code to covert the Gherkin scripts into actionable items to drive the functionality on the App. In our talk, we will discuss how we set up this framework and how we work together with the various domains, especially with development. We will go deeper in the advantages and disadvantages of this approach.

Speakers
avatar for Carlo Matulessy

Carlo Matulessy

Carlo is a software developer with a passion for Android Development. He is currently active as a Young Professional for Capgemini Netherlands. His latest assignment is to automate test scripts for the Android and iOS app with help of Appium, Selenium, Java and Cucumber (Gherkin).
avatar for Simon `Peter´ Schrijver

Simon `Peter´ Schrijver

Owner, TesT-PRO
Simon `Peter´ Schrijver is a very experienced all-round tester, who has worked since 1997 as tester, test coordinator and test manager. He has several years of experience using SBTM as a test approach. Since 2005, Simon works as an independent consultant. He visits annually at least two conferences and two training sessions to keep his knowledge up to date and where necessary, broaden/deepen his knowledge. | Simon is also an active member of... Read More →


Tuesday August 9, 2016 11:00 - 12:00
Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

11:00

Embedded Testers Aren’t Undercover Cops
Life as an embedded tester is awesome.
It’s the perfect position for a tester to influence the way software is produced instead of just waiting
for whatever the great development machine pumps out at the end of each cycle.
It’s also challenging, frustrating and sometimes confusing, but if you do it right; it will kick you out of
your comfort zone and make you question everything you learned so far about making better
software.
Last year I was the first embedded tester at a company, surrounded by people who knew nothing
about what I do as a tester, but as the team grew, so did the acceptance of our role.
Developers, product owners and architects started to value and rely on the work we do and our
input was incorporated into the software delivery process.
Deciding how we wanted to do our jobs and standing by our decision opened the door for us to
become valuable players in the development game and established a context in which testers
stepped out of the scenery and into the story.
Thinking back on my previous roles – both as an embedded and an independent tester – I realized
that the principles are the same:
• Own the product. We have the same goal, so each of us has to take responsibility.
• Don’t believe the hype. Agile or not; the solution that suits the project best is the one to go with,
regardless of the latest trends.
• Watch the methods. Both in development and testing. No point criticizing the outcome of a
process we know isn’t right for the project.
• Roll with the punches. A project in a transitional phase cannot afford to get stuck with processes
that don’t work.
Much of what I’m going to talk about can be especially useful for testers working in independent
teams. Simply realizing that you’re not the only one concerned with quality can change your attitude
and that change can catch on quicker than you think.

Speakers
avatar for Sandor Boros

Sandor Boros

Software Testing, Data, Bioinformatics


Tuesday August 9, 2016 11:00 - 12:00
Labatt Hall (1700) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

11:00

Quality From the Ground Up - Lessons Learned from Tearing the Walls Down
During this talk, I will describe the three stages of development of Sonos' iPad application and the lessons we learned at each stage. These learnings helped us forge an environment that supports the creation and delivery of high quality products. Over the course of five years, Sonos has continually evolved our software organization to foster a culture where we all own quality. I will walk the audience through the initial development of our iPad application as well as two overhauls of the UI, explain the lessons we learned, and share the methods that work well for us in building high quality applications.

· Moving from an org where testers, developers, designers, product managers and others worked in isolated silos to working as a fully integrated team from the start
· Investing in key technical debt early on to enable future accelerated growth
· Finding the right balance between prototyping and user testing in order to code great experiences with the least number of iterations
· Clearly defining a project's desired outcome (and how to measure it)

Speakers
avatar for Frank Charlton

Frank Charlton

Software Test Lead / Manager, Sonos
Frank Charlton likes to break things and think through problems in creative ways. He found his way into testing after a career in the music industry where (it turns out) he was building the same kinds of skills he utilizes to this day. He is a Software Test Lead for Sonos where he works primarily on their applications, and tries to ensure the Seattle office is blasting good music throughout the day. With a strong passion for UI, he works in a... Read More →


Tuesday August 9, 2016 11:00 - 12:00
Canfor Policy Room (1600) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

11:00

Babble & Dabble: Creating Bonds Across Disciplines
As testers, we sit in the middle of the software development process surrounded by specialists with different strengths. Our environment provides many opportunities for us to promote our skills and seek to understand the skills of others. Yet many testers fail to foster the collaborative practices required for this exchange of knowledge.

Testing that is influenced by information from outside our discipline will be better than testing performed in isolation. Business analysts guide us towards what our customers want, developers help us to prioritize testing vulnerable areas of the application, and support provides a deeper understanding of the way customers really use our software.

Similarly, other specialists can benefit from the skills offered by testing. Business analysts learn to evaluate their own requirements from a test perspective, developers start to build testable software, and support improves the way that they document user-reported bugs.

Beyond simply sharing skills, testers benefit from being part of a software development team where testing is widely understood, where there is shared ownership of testing tasks, and where testing is valued. To cultivate this environment testers must promote collaboration so they can teach and be taught.

Katrina and Carol explain how to spread ideas between disciplines. They describe how using broadcast techniques like “lunch & learn” presentations, internal conferences, or learning pathways are useful to raise awareness. They also share their experiences with promoting active learning through hands-on activities like pairing, peer reviews, or huddles.

Speakers
avatar for Carol Brands

Carol Brands

Software Tester, DNV GL Software
Carol Brands began her software career working as a technical support representative, where she developed an empathy and understanding for her users. After choosing to focus on testing, she moved to DNV GL Software and spent the next three years developing her testing skills and studying online. Carol became a student of Miagi-Do School of Testing, presented a poster paper at PNSQC, joined Software Delivery 24/7, and actively participates in... Read More →
avatar for Katrina Clokie

Katrina Clokie

Testing Coach, Bank of New Zealand
Katrina Clokie serves a team of about 30 testers as a Testing Coach at the Bank of New Zealand in Wellington. She is an active contributor to the international testing community as the editor of Testing Trapeze magazine, a mentor with Speak Easy, a co-founder of her local testing MeetUp WeTest Workshops, an international conference speaker, frequent blogger and tweeter.


Tuesday August 9, 2016 11:00 - 12:00
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (1900) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

12:00

Lunch
Tuesday August 9, 2016 12:00 - 13:15
Segal Centre (1400-1430) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

12:15

"CAST Live"
“CAST Live” is a show broadcast live each day and is hosted by Benjamin Yaroch and Dee Ann Pizzica. Ben and Dee will host lively panel discussions, interview influential testers, and discuss all things testing.

We will be broadcasting live both days, so join us during the lunch hour for “CAST Live.”

Guests:
Richard Bradshaw
Dawn Haynes

Speakers
avatar for Dee Ann Pizzica

Dee Ann Pizzica

Sr. Software Quality Engineer, Salesforce
Dee Ann Pizzica is a software tester in the Chicago area. She is currently employed at Salesforce, where she works remote with a fantastic Indianapolis-based team. Dee Ann has been exploring the software industry for over ten years. She is an active member of the Association for Software Testing since 2007. She served two terms on the AST board of directors, holding executive committee positions as both Executive Vice President and... Read More →
avatar for Benjamin Yaroch

Benjamin Yaroch

Senior Software Quality Engineer, Salesforce
Benjamin Yaroch is a software tester who views software testing as a skilled craft and his chosen career. Ben has held both individual contributor and management roles within software testing. He has also served on the board of directors of the Association for Software Testing and most recently as President. Ben is located in Madison WI and enjoys sharing his passion for testing with others and is active in the software testing community both... Read More →


Tuesday August 9, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (1900) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

13:15

Test Management Revisited

Cross-functional teams with a tester embedded into a small agile team is a popular and on-trend approach to distributing the testing effort across software development. Ebay, Google, Microsoft are some of the more well-known names to have adopted this approach.

How does test management fit into this? Does it even have a place in organisations wanting flatter hierarchical models? Should all testers report to delivery leads? 

At Tyro Payments, we’ve built a team from 5 to 23 testers in one year. The emphasis has been on training and coaching so each tester is the expert within their team able to continuously improve the testing process. However, as we grew, the approach had to be constantly revised. We experimented with many ideas, pivoted a few times and constantly evolved our ideas about what it meant to lead testing in a high growth organisation.

This keynote will describe that journey ending with some thoughts on test management and how it might fit (or not) into a future where the only certainty we have is that testing will look very different to what we do today.


Speakers
avatar for Anne-Marie Charrett

Anne-Marie Charrett

Test Consultant, Testing Times
Anne-Marie Charrett is a testing coach and trainer with a passion for helping testers discover their testing strengths and become the testers they aspire to be. Anne-Marie offers free IM Coaching to testers and developers on Skype (id charretts) and is is working on a book with James Bach on coaching testers. An electronic engineer by trade, testing discovered Anne-Marie when she started conformance testing to ETSI standards. She was hooked... Read More →


Tuesday August 9, 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (1900) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

14:15

Room Change
Tuesday August 9, 2016 14:15 - 14:30
SFU Harbour Centre Concourse Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

14:30

Cooperating to Exercise Judgment and Skill: Requirements
Requirement engineering is an important part of the software development lifecycle. Gathering the right information so we can build the right system is critical for a project’s success. Regardless of how this information takes form, whether it comes in formal requirement specifications, user stories, or even just general ideas in a spreadsheet, ­this first step is the key to reducing bugs in our software and building better quality products. It has been estimated that almost 50% of bugs are the result of poorly written requirements.

How can we avoid bad requirements and reduce the number of bugs in our products? We can have testers involved early in the requirements process and ensure that requirements are written to be complete, consistent, and testable. Although there are lots of methods that will help remove bugs from requirements, I believe a human factor (and ideally a tester) is needed to really understand what the stakeholders are trying to communicate. Testers bring a different perspective and dynamic skill set that can be very valuable in requirement gathering. Testers can become active participants in the requirement process, and should advocate for well written and testable requirements. This session will explore why testers should be involved in the requirement process, how they can contribute, and the impact on quality this can have on a project.

Speakers
avatar for Julie Lebo

Julie Lebo

QA Lead, ARL:UT
Julie Lebo is a software engineer with over six years of test engineering experience. Her software testing experience started as a student where she developed her interest andappreciation for finding bugs and solving problems. After graduation, she continued on as a software developer and quickly became the lead test engineer for a software development group at Northrop Grumman. Julie now leads a small test team for a complex software... Read More →


Tuesday August 9, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Canfor Policy Room (1600) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

14:30

Create the Change You Want
"Want to learn new skills without changing jobs? Many people in our industry don’t last more than two or three years in the same job because they get bored and feel they aren’t learning any more. It doesn’t have to be this way! When you change jobs there is a lot of upfront effort of searching for the right job and then learning about your new context before any opportunities to learn new things arise. It is therefore more desirable if you can skip all that and learn new skills where you are now.

In this presentation I share personal tips and tricks with practical examples to grow your skills and experiences without needing to change jobs. I discuss how your existing status and long term relationships can provide you with opportunities to initiate change. I encourage you to become a coach or mentor as a means to improve your teaching skills and be challenged to critically analyse the way you work. I demonstrate how to review your processes to see if there is something you are currently doing that you could be doing better or differently."

Speakers
avatar for Peter Bartlett

Peter Bartlett

Snr QA Engineer, Campaign Monitor
I’m a senior technical QA Engineer at Campaign Monitor, where I’ve worked for over 6 years. I’ve experienced a company growing from 10 people to over 150 people. I’ve had 3 different managers and experimented with a number of different methodologies and technologies. I’ve faced a wide range of experiences and challenges as a result. I love to solve problems and improve my own testing skills... Read More →


Tuesday August 9, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Labatt Hall (1700) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

14:30

Teaching Testing to Non-Testers
As more companies move toward iterative and team based software development practices, testing is sometimes done by various members of the team. How do you reduce the risk associated with this practice? In addition, how do you provide a level of understanding into the depths of testing for other software development disciplines? In order to answer these questions for my organization I developed a workshop that was given to small cross discipline groups on a monthly basis. In this interactive session I’ll review what was taught in the workshop, what worked, what didn’t, and how the idea could be implemented in your organization.

Speakers
avatar for Kate Falanga

Kate Falanga

Director, Quality Assurance, Huge
Kate Falanga (Director, Quality Assurance at Huge) has over 14 years of digital experience. At Huge she works with a full time team of quality assurance professionals as well as actively supports projects and project teams with testing mentorship. As part of her role she works alongside other leadership within the company on overall technical strategy. Outside of Huge, Kate co-created  the New York City Testing meetup group whose goal is... Read More →


Tuesday August 9, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (1900) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

14:30

Tester's Role in Agile Requirements Exploration
Roles are blurred in agile projects, but it is not always clear where testers can help. Testers want to be involved early and by incorporating the testing mindset, we improve customer exploration of product needs. At the same time, agile test planning and delivery benefits from involvement in agile requirements analysis. Janet Gregory will lead this experiential workshop, in which participants examine a subset of agile analysis models in tandem with specifying acceptance criteria to verify and validate requirements. Participants experience how incorporating the tester mindset and using test techniques during requirements exploration accelerates test planning and specification, enhances product quality, and uncovers missing, conflicting, erroneous and unnecessary requirements. Learn how requirements exploration promotes early test specification and increases requirements and product quality.

Speakers
avatar for Janet Gregory

Janet Gregory

Agile Coach, DragonFire Inc.
An agile testing coach and practitioner, Janet Gregory (@janetgregoryca) is the co-author of Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams, More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team, and a contributor to 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know. Janet specializes in showing agile teams how testers can add value in areas beyond critiquing the product for example, guiding development with business-facing tests. For the... Read More →


Tuesday August 9, 2016 14:30 - 17:00
Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

15:30

Break
Tuesday August 9, 2016 15:30 - 16:00
SFU Harbour Centre Concourse Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

16:00

How I Used 'My Mindset Toolkit' to Develop a Tester's Mindset
Quite a lot of testers miss out on the required mindset for testing. Sometimes it seems that quality consciousness is missing. Little wonder why some testers only find obvious bugs and why quality is far-fetched from the device under test (DUT) despite the presence of testers on the project.

In this presentation I hope to present to you a set of tools that has helped me during my personal journey as a tester. These tools have helped me grow in my reasoning about the challenges I’m faced with on my daily task. My way of reasoning evolved into a set of tools that I refer to as “Mindset Tools”.
While I reflected on my daily task and how to keep growing, I discovered that different task, required different lenses viewed at different angles with different mindsets hence to effectively test I need to tweak my mindset for different task. To achieve this, I need to keep my mindset flexible when I test. To keep my mindset flexible and help me look at things from different angles, I try to put a label on the mindset approaches that I find useful and I call it ”Mindset Toolkit”

I will talk about how my "Mindset Toolkit" has helped me grow from a tester that finds obvious bugs to a tester that finds important bugs. I will give examples of different mindset tools and how I have used them to become a better tester.

A few of these Mindset Tools are: User Mindset Tool, “Already Tested” Mindset Tool, Confidence Mindset Tool, Trust Mindset Tool, Courage Mindset Tool, Communicator Mindset Tool, Lazy Tester's Mindset Tool, Analytical Mindset Tool, Bug Finder Mindset Tool, Curiosity Mindset Tool, “Bug Conviction “Mindset Tool, “Business” Mindset Tool, “Dog Style” Mindset Tool, “Cat Style Mindset Tool."

Speakers
avatar for Vivien Ibironke Ibiyemi

Vivien Ibironke Ibiyemi

Senior Development engineer, House of Test AB
My name is Vivien. Some folks call me by my native name: Ronke but I also like to describe myself as a terrific tester! I have coined this from my terrific love for testing and the aggressiveness with which I approach my test task. However I take the definition of terrific that is defined as “awesome” in description of my personality as a tester and that part of being terrifying (fear and awe) towards bugs and anything that degrades the... Read More →


Tuesday August 9, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Labatt Hall (1700) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

16:00

What Developers Have Taught Me About Testing
What happens when you are brought into an organisation to build and teach testing only to find out you are the one needing the lesson?

This is a true story about how a tester with thirty years experience got taught the lesson of listening to your stakeholders by a group of developers.

The exercise was not only a lesson in learning to listen properly but it's helped me understand the importance of trust. In testing we talk a lot about reputation and credibility giving you a seat at the stakeholders table but without building trust we can lose that position very quickly.

What exactly is trust for testers? How can we go about building it?

Speakers
avatar for Anne-Marie Charrett

Anne-Marie Charrett

Test Consultant, Testing Times
Anne-Marie Charrett is a testing coach and trainer with a passion for helping testers discover their testing strengths and become the testers they aspire to be. Anne-Marie offers free IM Coaching to testers and developers on Skype (id charretts) and is is working on a book with James Bach on coaching testers. An electronic engineer by trade, testing discovered Anne-Marie when she started conformance testing to ETSI standards. She was hooked... Read More →


Tuesday August 9, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Canfor Policy Room (1600) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

16:00

How King Uses AI in Testing
Find out how AI techniques is used to test Candy Crush Saga games. Candy Crush Saga is one of the biggest mobile games today and there's a huge demand for new levels on top of already existing 1000+ levels. With frequent releases of new levels the challenge to regression test all levels to make sure all levels are ok is increasingly getting harder for each release. Alexander will describe how King tackles this testing task with help of AI together with existing test frameworks and share valuable takeaways, after presentation you will have a better understanding how AI can help you with testing that's getting to difficult to master with traditional testing techniques. 

- AI in test
- test bots
- regression testing

Speakers
avatar for Alexander Andelkovic

Alexander Andelkovic

Agile Testing Lead, King
Passionate agile tester with focus on AI bot testing.


Tuesday August 9, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (1900) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

17:30

Reception

Join us for a cocktail, hors d’ oeuvre, and socializing.


Tuesday August 9, 2016 17:30 - 20:00
Segal Centre (1400-1430) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

17:30

Tester Games
Stop in to play a game with fellow testers, or bring your own game, puzzle or testing challenge.

Tuesday August 9, 2016 17:30 - 20:00
Segal Centre (1400-1430) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

19:00

Member Discussion on Ethics
Moderators
avatar for Richard Robinson

Richard Robinson

Contract Technical Test Manager, Independent Tester
Richard Robinson is a thought-leader in testing strategies, and an inspiring test manager. His philosophy is “better, faster, cheaper” testing that pushes the maximum business value and product quality out of a product. This approach not only satisfies the end user, but also brings a high return on testing investment to the customer. | Richard is the President of the Sydney Testers Meetup group, and holds a black belt in the Miagi-do... Read More →

Board of Directors
avatar for Eric Proegler

Eric Proegler

Product Manager, SOASTA
I am a Product Manager at SOASTA (www.soasta.com). I've worked in testing for 16 years, and specialized in performance and reliability testing for 13. I am a Board Member for AST, the Association for Software Testing, and an organizer for WOPR, the Workshop on Performance and Reliability. I've presented and facilitated at CAST, WOPR, Agile 2015, Oredev, STPCon, PNSQC, and STiFS. In my free time, I'm into travel, food trucks... Read More →
avatar for Ilari Henrik Aegerter

Ilari Henrik Aegerter

Managing Director, House of Test GmbH
Ilari Henrik Aegerter's formal studies have brought him from General Linguistics and Sociology to Software Engineering and Software Testing. He has 10+ years of experience in the field, coming from the medical software domain at Phonak AG and progressing ... Read More →
avatar for Justin Rorhman

Justin Rorhman

Software Tester
Justin has been a professional software tester in various capacities since 2005. In his current role, Justin is a consulting software tester and writer working with Excelon Development. Outside of work, he is currently serving on the Association For Software Testing Board of Directors as President helping to facilitate and develop projects like BBST, WHOSE, and the annual conference CAST. Justin deeply interested in software testing and delivery... Read More →


Tuesday August 9, 2016 19:00 - 20:00
Segal Centre (1400-1430) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3
 
Wednesday, August 10
 

07:30

Lean Coffee
Lean Coffee is a structured, but agenda-less meeting. Participants gather, build an agenda, and begin talking. Conversations are directed and productive because the agenda for the meeting was democratically generated. 

The format for a Lean Coffee is very simple. This is intentional. It is meant to be the least structure necessary for a coherent and productive meeting. No more, no less.

From http://leancoffee.org/

Wednesday August 10, 2016 07:30 - 08:30
Teck Gallery Lounge (1305) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

08:00

Breakfast
Wednesday August 10, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Segal Centre (1400-1430) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

09:00

Neuro-Diversity and Software Development: Why the Tech Industry Needs all Kinds of Minds and How We Can Support Them
Even if you are unaware of it, it’s likely that there is someone on your team (or has been in the past) with a non-typical neurology. It even seems there is a higher propensity towards autism and aspergers in STEM careers. Turns out that is actually a good thing.
We will begin by looking at the research on diversity and success.
We will then consider what is known about the autistic / aspergers mind with a particular view towards how that lend itself to developing software and how we might better support autists at work.
What about other forms of neurodiversity? We will look at depression, bipolar disorder and ADHD and consider why you might want such diversity on your team and how you can best support it.

Speakers
avatar for Sallyann Freudenberg

Sallyann Freudenberg

@salFreudenberg
Dr. Sallyann Freudenberg is an agile coach, consultant and trainer with a keen focus on psychology and collaboration.  | She holds a PhD in the Psychology of Collaborative Software Development, performs ethnographic research, publishes and speaks about the ways that experienced agile teams interact, with a particular interest in distributed cognition and the psychology of pair programming. Sal discovered that far from being a solitary or... Read More →


Wednesday August 10, 2016 09:00 - 10:40
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (1900) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

10:40

Break
Wednesday August 10, 2016 10:40 - 11:00
SFU Harbour Centre Concourse Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

11:00

Alpha Testing as a Catalyst for Organizational Change
Alpha Testing is typically defined as preliminary software field testing performed in order to find bugs that were not found previously through lab tests.

This definition understates the value of alpha testing, as my experience is that alpha testing can be successfully used very early in the software development cycle to quickly find the bugs that really matter: those with high impact to the customer.

My experience also shows that alpha testing can be used to find not just software functional issues, but hardware issues and issues in customer documentation and training as well.

Finally, my experience is that alpha testing can be used as a catalyst to build product knowledge throughout an organization, leading to the biggest benefit of all: a more successful product launch.

Speakers
avatar for Steven Woody

Steven Woody

Experienced in software resiliency and longevity testing. I enjoy working with software developers to improve software robustness and reliability, creating products with exceptional quality.


Wednesday August 10, 2016 11:00 - 12:00
Canfor Policy Room (1600) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

11:00

Can Testing Teams Play a Key Role in Bridging the Gaps Between Development, Operations and Testing to Follow a DevOps Culture?
IT organizations are adopting DevOps practices to enable frequent software releases to production to achieve faster time to market & improve the overall customer experience. But adopting DevOps practices requires a cultural shift in terms of people, process & technology transformation across development, testing & operations teams. Many organizations experience significant challenges to enable DevOps adoption, particularly implementing DevOps in legacy shops has been far more difficult. There exists a mindset that DevOps is about throwing away everything you have built so far & starting from the scratch. Improving communications and collaborations between IT teams and other key organizational units is a challenging endeavor. The need to maintain existing organizational structures for regulatory and audit compliance while focusing on eliminating siloed behavior can lead to mistakes and systems outages in legacy organizations.

Developers, testers & operations engineers usually have different roles, different responsibilities, different job descriptions, and different management in the traditional IT organizations. They all work as distinct entities. Can testing team's play a key role in such situations & enable DevOps adoption? The presentation will take a look at that questions and provide practical answers.
Also, the approach to scale the traditional automation testing infrastructure, test environments, and test data management requires a culture shift using new tools and techniques and most importantly collaboration with Dev and Ops teams. In this session, Sujay will discuss a DevOps strategy for testing teams where he will share examples of tools, techniques and practical solutions he and his teams successfully implemented for one their large clients.

Speakers
avatar for Sujay Honnamane

Sujay Honnamane

QA Director, Cognizant Technology Solutions
Sujay is an accomplished IT leader and testing portfolio director at Cognizant. A thought leader in global delivery and establishing testing organizations, Sujay brings along expertise in the fields of test consulting, test automation and DevOps strategy. Sujay is a avid reader, blogger and an international speaker, he has strong orientation towards leadership, teamwork and innovation.


Wednesday August 10, 2016 11:00 - 12:00
Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

11:00

Lessons Learned in Implementing Exploratory Testing
Many organizations are not ready to accept the differences between exploratory testing and more traditional testing methods. As testers who have an exploratory approach to testing it can be challenging to gain acceptance and buy-in from leadership. As an exploratory tester, Nancy Kelln has implemented exploratory testing concepts at various organizations over the past six years. Her experience spans implementing these concepts as a tester, a test lead, and also as a manager. She also has experience in selling exploratory testing to testing teams, management, leadership and senior leadership across numerous IT organizations. During these implementations she has experienced many successful and failed attempts. Thru stories from the trenches we will examine the lessons learned at each of the organizations and share with attendees what worked and what didn’t. As well as how to recover when things go awry. If you are working with exploratory testing or have taken the Rapid Software Testing course and are wondering how to implement, this session will give you some valuable insight in to how to proceed.

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Kelln

Nancy Kelln

Test Manager, FGL Sports Ltd.
Test Manager at FGL Sports Ltd. with over 16 years of divers IT experience, Nancy enjoys working with teams that are implementing or enhancing their testing practices and provides adaptive testing approaches to both exploratory and traditional testing teams. She has coached test teams in various environments and facilitated numerous local and international workshops and presentations. From small scale to multi-million dollar projects; Nancy has... Read More →


Wednesday August 10, 2016 11:00 - 12:00
Labatt Hall (1700) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

11:00

Shifting the Testing Role Pendulum
10+ years ago, many of us started our careers in testing on a move from an internal role - from the business side or similar. It was common for people who were users of the product to be hired to jump start their technical career. Now, we have seen an influx of tester positions that require coding experience or a Computer Science degree. In this session, Melissa will discuss the changing landscape of the role of testers, the challenges with hiring developers with no previous testing experience and a plan to "shift the pendulum" back to be able to blend technical acumen with a user advocacy role. 

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Tondi

Melissa Tondi

Head of SQE, ShopAtHome.com
Melissa Tondi has spent most of her career working within software testing teams - concentrating on functional, performance, security, and mobile testing techniques. She is the founder of Denver Mobile and Quality (DMAQ), a board member for Software Quality Association of Denver (SQuAD), and head of SQE at ShopatHome.com, where she assists teams to continuously improve the process of quality software—from design to delivery. In her software... Read More →


Wednesday August 10, 2016 11:00 - 12:00
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (1900) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

12:00

Lunch
Wednesday August 10, 2016 12:00 - 13:15
Segal Centre (1400-1430) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

12:15

"CAST Live"
“CAST Live” is a show broadcast live each day and is hosted by Benjamin Yaroch and Dee Ann Pizzica. Ben and Dee will host lively panel discussions, interview influential testers, and discuss all things testing.

We will be broadcasting live both days, so join us during the lunch hour for “CAST Live.”

Guests:
Janet Gregory
Anne-Marie Charrett

Speakers
avatar for Dee Ann Pizzica

Dee Ann Pizzica

Sr. Software Quality Engineer, Salesforce
Dee Ann Pizzica is a software tester in the Chicago area. She is currently employed at Salesforce, where she works remote with a fantastic Indianapolis-based team. Dee Ann has been exploring the software industry for over ten years. She is an active member of the Association for Software Testing since 2007. She served two terms on the AST board of directors, holding executive committee positions as both Executive Vice President and... Read More →
avatar for Benjamin Yaroch

Benjamin Yaroch

Senior Software Quality Engineer, Salesforce
Benjamin Yaroch is a software tester who views software testing as a skilled craft and his chosen career. Ben has held both individual contributor and management roles within software testing. He has also served on the board of directors of the Association for Software Testing and most recently as President. Ben is located in Madison WI and enjoys sharing his passion for testing with others and is active in the software testing community both... Read More →


Wednesday August 10, 2016 12:15 - 13:00
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (1900) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

13:15

25 Years of Testing Through the Words of a Rockstar
A fun presentation with music and lyrics to relate my experience in testing over the last 25 years and perhaps a glimpse into the future. From punch cards to windows to mobile devices, there have been a lot of changes in how we test but yet many of the challenges are human issues and they remain the same in every environment. The talk will give insight into the thinking at PQA and where we are trying to take our testing company.

Speakers
avatar for Keith McIntosh

Keith McIntosh

PQA
I am the founder and co­CEO of PQA Testing as well as the founder and CEO of PLATO, a company that will be led and staffed by Aboriginal testers across Canada. I began my career as a tester at CARIS in 1990, spent a couple of years as a consultant, and founded PQA in 1997. I've built automation scripts with screen coordinates, lived through Y2K, led test teams in healthcare and finance and GIS, and built a company of 100 of the best testers... Read More →


Wednesday August 10, 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Labatt Hall (1700) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

13:15

How Do I Reach the Congregation When I’m Preaching to the Choir?
Professional development is important – everyone attending this conference knows that. What about those that aren’t attending conferences, reading books or following testing thought leaders online? Erik and Rob have had a variety of experiences working with those that are absolutely energized about their career and those that sometimes seem to only just want a job and nothing more. Over the past few months they have been exploring this topic in their own communities as well as through sessions at conferences.
 
There were a couple of questions they were curious about:
  • How do we reach more testers
  • How do we “sell” professional development
  • Should we “sell” professional development
In this session they will reflect on some of their own experiences and successes. As well, report on some of the findings they have come across over the past few months. And hopefully, gather more insights from the attendees at this session. 

Attendee takeaways include:
  • Reflection on promoting professional development
  • Learn how others approach promoting professional development
  • Discover ways to reach the testers who do their job but are not engaged in the community or do not show an interest in professional development
  • Hopefully we will have provided attendees enough information as to draw their own conclusions as to whether professional development needs to be promoted

Speakers
avatar for Rob Bowyer

Rob Bowyer

Qaulity Assurance Manager, eSolutions Group
Rob has been helping people and teams test software in a rapid and cognitive manner for over a decade. As a coach and leader, Rob focuses on mentorship and enabling testers to succeed. With a strong foundation in the context driven school of testing Rob has had experience in a wide variety of domains – including healthcare, mobile, education and municipal. | In his own back yard, Rob maintains a stewardship role in his local software quality... Read More →
avatar for Erik Davis

Erik Davis

Hyland, creator of OnBase
Erik has over 16 years of experience in and around software testing. He's been everything from a junior tester to a manager of managers. Currently, Erik is focused on expanding automation within the Test team at work. He also leads the team that delivers all internal test education to his company’s 200+ testers. Erik has been a member of AST since 2012 and is currently a Director and Executive at Large. He has been a conference speaker since... Read More →


Wednesday August 10, 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Canfor Policy Room (1600) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

13:15

Is There a Risk?

If I wake you up in the middle of the night, are you able to tell me, as a good tester, what risks are still applicable in your system under test? And what impact these risks can have when this software goes to production? Although I never had to wake my testers up, in many cases they couln't answer the question! In my opinion: covering risks is underestimated because we don't like the subject: it is too abstract, sometimes too philosophical or negative. While on the other hand if we have to deal with problems in production because we underestimated risks, fingers are pointed at those who were able to cover the risks (such as testers). Dealing with riks determines the success of a product and therefore the success of a organization. I will look how organizations should be organized to get the maximum commitment of their empoyees and if this is the case: motivated testers who feel free to communicate about risks. Nowadays I am working in an organization using the agile/scrum approach and my role changed from test manager to test facilitator. This doesn't mean that the focus on risks disappeared. On the contrary: I see a lot of risks at the integration level of systems that are not recognized and not covered because no scrum team feeds responsible. Therefor I like to discuss the following question: 'how to communicate with the focus on risks?". This should be a focus point in the communication between testers, developers, analysts and stakeholders. I will look at 2 kind of risks I see: product risks and project/process risks. After this elaboration I like to discuss how to communicate effectively as testers in a scrum team and as a test facilitator on risks without being sees as the guy who is constantly looking at the dark sight. So how can we improve communcation within and amount scrum teams and with an implementation manager responsible for a release with risks as important subject? I will use my current assignment as the experience report for the discussion.

Take aways:

Do you know the meaning of your organization, system, product?

Can you deliver the important risks right away?

How can you communicate about the (process and product) risks your dealing with?


Speakers
avatar for Ard Kramer

Ard Kramer

consultant, Alten Nederland
As a Qualisoof (Qualisopher) I am someone “who loves truth and wisdom and at the same time is decisive to improve man and his environment”. This means that I am curious about the world around me and that my leading question is 'Why?'


Wednesday August 10, 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

13:15

Why Companies Without Testers are the Best Place to Be One
Many software development companies claim they don’t have testers. They claim that practices like TDD, Continuous Integration, Continuous Deployment, and production monitoring eliminate the need for separate testing groups and phases. While this attitude is concentrated in startups and Silicon Valley companies, knowledge of these techniques is spreading, and “platform as a service” technologies, containerization, and increasingly mature CI frameworks are making it easier for enterprises to bring these practices to their internal software development projects.

This might sound like a threat to the livelihood of skilled testers. Some of the appeal of these practices to large enterprises is definitely in the opportunity to get rid of low-value “quality assurance” departments.

However, these are often exactly the places where skilled explorers should want to work. When you solve the boring, tedious problems that take up much of many testers’ time, “exploration” becomes a high status skillset with applications across the software development process.

I’ll share how the tools and practices that Pivotal uses (without a formal test phase) work, and how they make it and companies like it a great place to be an explorer. I’ll describe how the role of “engineer with a subspecialty in exploration” has evolved as we’ve learned more about the weaknesses of our existing feedback systems, and how a more formal approach to exploration fits into our practices. I’ll also talk about how to use testing skills to get a job at a company that “doesn’t have testers,” and about how to implement these practices at your own company, while highlighting some common pitfalls.

Speakers
avatar for Natalie Bennett

Natalie Bennett

Pivotal Labs
Natalie J. Bennett is a software engineer with a specialty in exploration Pivotal, working on the open source cloud platform Cloud Foundry. She got into software testing by accident, and spent several years as a tester at different companies while she learned to explore and build software. Now she pairs with other engineers at Pivotal to write code, maintain continuous integration pipelines, and explore potential problems. She... Read More →


Wednesday August 10, 2016 13:15 - 14:15
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (1900) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

14:15

Room Change
Wednesday August 10, 2016 14:15 - 14:30
SFU Harbour Centre Concourse Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

14:30

Lightning Talks

Have something to say? Want to stand on your soapbox? Do a lightning talk! A lightning talk is five minutes or less, no slides, just you and the audience. Sign up information will be available at the registration desk.


Wednesday August 10, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Labatt Hall (1700) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

14:30

Against a Harmful Divide: Testing as the Lifeblood of Development
Testing is not optional in software development. Development without testing is impossible. While the existence of "QA" departments and the future of the role of the dedicated tester might be up for debate, the importance of careful model-building, empirical investigation, effective issue reporting and advocacy, and other skills endemic to skilled testers are not.

Every developer who says they "don't know how to test" nonetheless uses testing skills as a first recourse when something doesn't work. This being software development, "something doesn't work" _a lot,_ and so, developers test, _a lot._ This is true even in the absence of practices that formalize the role of testing in the act of programming, such as TDD and BDD.

So why do they think they can't test effectively? Why do _we_ think that? What can we do about it? What have we been doing to perpetuate a world where developers can shrug off the responsibility for being good at such an important part of their jobs?

This talk will cover the importance of testing skills and practices to our friends in Product, Design and Engineering roles, and contemplate how seeing testing as separate - be it as a separate org, a separate team, a separate role or even just a separate person, lengthens or even opens feedback loops, retards growth of testing skills, and invites problems into the development process. It will also discuss a growing awareness across these disciplines of the importance of traditionally testing-related skills and practices, and how testers can work to eliminate this divide, or make it less harmful.

If testing is a key catalyst of development, can anyone afford for it to belong to testers alone?

Speakers
avatar for Jesse Alford

Jesse Alford

Exploratory Tester/Software Engineer, Pivotal Labs
I help people. I do this by learning things. This is an expansive mandate, and I love pursuing it.


Wednesday August 10, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (1900) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

14:30

It's Certainly Uncertain - Fostering Healthy Uncertainty on Software Projects
Fear of uncertainty is natural and human. Few of us would be happy not knowing when we or our loved ones could eat again, or whether bombs might drop on us tonight.

Yet some people joyously embrace particular uncertain situations, seeing opportunities to exercise and hone their skills. Others detest all uncertainty and seek to deny it or will it away.

Many managers discourage behaviour that exposes uncertainty. They don’t want to hear about risks, and they don’t like people asking too many questions. In their minds, exploration promotes uncertainty because it’s unpredictable and uncontrollable. They prefer absolutes:

• Immovable delivery dates and fixed costs

• Mandated “best practices” and controlled processes that (they believe) produce predictable results

• Hard numbers that purport to tell them exactly what’s going on

Good testers know that uncertainty is inescapable in software development (as in life), and it is better to embrace it on our projects than to run away from it. There are no best practices, and the only responsible answer is usually, “It depends.” It’s our job to expose uncertainty, and to help reduce it when possible.

But testers are not immune to human feelings. We also can fall into denial and too-easy answers.

In this interactive workshop, we’ll do group exercises and debriefs to tackle the questions:

• How can we grow our own tolerance for uncertainty and learn to embrace it?

• How can we promote a healthy attitude to uncertainty on our software projects?

Speakers
avatar for Fiona Charles

Fiona Charles

Principal Consultant, Quality Intelligence
Fiona Charles teaches organizations to manage their software testing risk, and IT practitioners project skills "beyond process" - hands-on practical skills essential to thrive and excel on any kind of software project. An expert test consultant and manager, she has been in the thick of the action through 30+ years of challenging projects across the business spectrum on both sides of the Atlantic. Throughout her career, Fiona has advocated... Read More →


Wednesday August 10, 2016 14:30 - 16:45
Canfor Policy Room (1600) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

14:30

Playing the Testing Game
Is life a game to you? Do you work with test or with testers? Do you want to get a deeper understanding of the testers role and interactions in the project? If so, come and join our workshop to play the “game of test” followed by discussions targeted towards knowledge and experience sharing between the members of the group.

The workshop centers around playing a board game where the player takes on the role of a tester within a fictive company. While playing the game there will be many similarities to real life which cause the player to consider their actions and reasonings. In order to dive deeper into these thoughts we will facilitate discussions around what it actually means to be a tester and the challenges we face. Participants will share and learn from each other in a fun setting.

Speakers
avatar for Andreas Cederholm (SE)

Andreas Cederholm (SE)

Test Consultant, House of Test AB
Andreas Cederholm is a member of the context-driven community and work as a consultant with House of Test. He is passionate about testing and have worked with it for more than 7 years. Time not spent on reading/writing/talking about test is spent on his other joy in life which is Crossfit.
avatar for Christopher Lebond

Christopher Lebond

Architect, Qlik
Christopher Lebond is a Software Architect who has spent most of his career focusing on Quality. Originally from England, Christopher’s career began in contracted web development. After moving to Sweden in the mid 2000’s, Christopher started working for Qlik Technologies in the Quality Assurance department focusing on testing, methodologies and improvements. After many years of formal and informal leadership positions, always with Quality... Read More →


Wednesday August 10, 2016 14:30 - 16:45
Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

15:30

Break
Wednesday August 10, 2016 15:30 - 15:50
SFU Harbour Centre Concourse Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

15:45

17 Reasons Why Life for Testers is Better With Agile

Some days it appears as if the entire software world is deciding to “go agile”, usually without tester input.  To those uninvolved in the decision agile becomes simply a moniker for change and as a result of this testers often view the approaching transition with trepidation, if not abject horror.  

In this session, Mike Hrycyk will explore 17 reasons why agile makes a tester’s project, success factors, even life, better.   From the pragmatic to the humorous, Mike will familiarize and humanize agile, relating it to what we already know and are comfortable with to help demonstrate that the change agile brings is really just a refocusing on what we already know works.

Some of the reasons include: Test involvement in early requirements discussions isn’t by chance anymore it’s a necessity; with two week sprints, Test can’t receive builds more than 10 days late; and of course – agile meeting toys. 


Speakers
avatar for Mike Hrycyk

Mike Hrycyk

Director of Quality, PQA Testing
Mike Hrycyk has been trapped in the world of quality since he first did user acceptance testing 18 years ago. He has survived all of the different levels and a wide spectrum of technologies and environments to become the quality dynamo that he is today. Mike believes in creating a culture of quality throughout software production and tries hard to create teams that hold this ideal and advocate it to the rest of their workmates. Mike is... Read More →


Wednesday August 10, 2016 15:45 - 16:45
Labatt Hall (1700) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

15:45

When You’re Evil: Building Credibility-Based Relationship with Developers
Developers are in the best position to provide us with the detailed technical assessment of risk for directing and scoping testing. Our relationship with the development team is crucial to removing threats to the software’s value. Yet the very nature of examining someone’s work to find flaws can set up an unhealthy, adversarial relationship. With the addition of prickly personalities and competing priorities, the relationship itself can be a threat.

Couching feedback in terms the technical team cares about while credibly representing the business goals sometimes requires, a careful examination of motivations, subtle manipulation, and gaming the system. Some of these you are doing already, perhaps without realizing it. With a careful and conscious application, you can be a little evil… and much more effective.

Over the years, Curtis has learned techniques for overcoming relationship obstacles and getting the developers to think of him as a valuable team member. Curtis will share these techniques with examples and stories of how he has used them over his career.

Speakers
avatar for Curtis Pettit

Curtis Pettit

Senior Software Test Engineer, Huge
Curtis graduated from Florida Institute of Technology (FIT) with a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Software Engineering. During his studies at FIT, he focused on software testing while working at the Center for Software Testing Education and Research. He spent eight years as an SDET at Microsoft, where he lead a transition from scripted manual test cases to session-based test management. Currently he works as a Senior Software Test Engineer for... Read More →


Wednesday August 10, 2016 15:45 - 16:45
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (1900) Simon Fraser University Vancouver 515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3